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Archive by tag: New Books NetworkReturn
Jul 23, 2021
In this episode of New Books Network, G.P. Gottlieb talks to Karen Salyer McElmurray about her novel Wanting Radiance (UP of Kentucky, 2020). Fifteen-year-old Miracelle Loving hears the gunshot that kills her mother and runs to hold her while she dies. She spends the next two decades roaming, fortune telling and picking up odd jobs. Then, […]
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Jun 18, 2021
A story about an alien invasion typically revolves around diplomacy, military strategy, technological one-upmanship, and brinksmanship. But the invaders in Andy Weir’s Project Hail Mary are anything but typical. Rather than a scheming sentient enemy, Weir gives readers Astrophage, an opponent who is mindless—and microscopic. Astrophage lives on—and taps energy from—the surface of stars. When […]
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Jun 11, 2021
The name of Dorothy Hale is not well known these days. In the 1920s, she enjoyed a career on Broadway as a dancer, including in a leading role with Fred Astaire. When an accidental injury ended that career, she auditioned for the filmmaker Samuel Goldwyn and landed a part opposite Ronald Coleman, who would later […]
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Jun 04, 2021
In this episode of New Books Network, Gabrielle Mathieu talks to Andrea Stewart about her novel The Bone Shard Daughter: The Drowning Empire Book One (Hachette UK, 2020). In a world of floating islands, various narrators try to achieve or avoid their destiny, or understand the mysteries of their existence. There’s Lin, the Emperor’s daughter, set […]
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Dec 11, 2020

Timothy Hampton’s Bob Dylan: How the Songs Work (Zone Books, 2020) is a fascinating and meticulous study of Bob Dylan’s songwriting craft. Hampton discusses how Dylan incorporated and then transcended the Greenwich Village folk music tradition; how he reinvented himself as a visionary poet in the mid ’60s; how he learned from poets as diverse […]

The post How Bob Dylan Reinvented Himself as a Poet first appeared on Literary Hub.

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Nov 27, 2020

In Stand by Me: The Forgotten History of Gay Liberation (Basic Books, 2016), the acclaimed historian Jim Downs rewrites the history of gay life in the 1970s, arguing that the decade was about much more than sex and marching in the streets. Drawing on a vast trove of untapped records at LGBT community centers in […]

The post Rewriting the History of 1970s Gay Liberation first appeared on Literary Hub.

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Nov 27, 2020

The intense interest in the horrors of World War II that has characterized the last few years has tended to overshadow other aspects of the long history of Jewish populations in Europe and the antisemitism that often—although not invariably—complicated that history. Michelle Cameron’s new novel, Beyond the Ghetto Gates (She Writes Press, 2020), explores one […]

The post Love and Persecution During Napoleon's Invasion of Ancona first appeared on Literary Hub.

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Oct 22, 2020

Have you ever heard yourself say something and think, “Oh, my god, I’m turning into my mother (or father)”? Robert Plomin explains why that happens in Blueprint: How DNA Makes Us Who We Are (MIT Press, 2019). Plomin’s decades of work show that genetics explains more about the psychological differences among people than all other […]

The post Why You're Turning Into Your Mother first appeared on Literary Hub.

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Oct 20, 2020

In my old age, I try to argue more quietly, though I still believe that sharp disagreement is a sign of political seriousness. What engaged citizens think and say matters; we should aim to get it right and to defeat those who get it wrong. I understand the very limited impact of what I write, […]

The post Michael Walzer on the Origins of Political Resentment first appeared on Literary Hub.

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Sep 24, 2020
In Hands Up, Don’t Shoot (NYU Press), Jennifer Cobbina draws on in-depth interviews with nearly two hundred residents of Ferguson and Baltimore, conducted within two months of the deaths of 18-year-old Michael Brown and 25-year-old Freddie Gray. Out of these local tragedies, a national movement was born, igniting fierce debate and calling attention to the […]
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Sep 18, 2020
The title of Harvard historian Alexander Keyssar’s new book poses the question that comes up every presidential election cycle: Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College? (Harvard University Press, 2020). Keyssar presents the reader with a deep, layered, and complex analysis not only of the institution of the Electoral College itself, drawing out how […]
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Aug 07, 2020
In 2009, a novel was released in Norway with a fairly simple premise; the author would simply write about himself, his life and his attempts to write. The autobiographical novel would be the first in a six-volume series that would eventually total over 3,500 pages written in just three short years. The frenzied pace at […]
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Aug 07, 2020
Few science fiction writers have their vision of the future tested immediately upon publication. But that’s what happened to Ilze Hugo, whose novel about a mysterious epidemic, The Down Days, debuted in the middle of the Covid-19 pandemic. “To be published right in the middle of all this is the most surreal experience,” Hugo says.  […]
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