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Archive by tag: Lit Hub DailyReturn
Jul 23, 2021
“I was concerned an actual apocalypse might arrive while my novel about a fictional one was still in copyediting.” Geoff Rodkey on accepting the realities of civilization-ending calamity. | Lit Hub On the opposite of hapless: Arika Okrent explains why negative descriptors tend to outlast their positive counterparts. | Lit Hub Nick McDonell talks to […]
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Jul 22, 2021
An unknown genius with a trunk full of poems: Richard Zenith on the mysteries and identities of Fernando Pessoa. | Lit Hub Biography “For so long, I have been trying to make sense of my body, my gender, all of this that has been dropped into my lap.” Matt Mitchell on building his own intersex canon of […]
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Jul 21, 2021
“Fire, that trickster’s loot, that gift from the gods, burned more than 4,000,000 acres of my home state last year—a number so vast it is mere abstraction.” Lauren Markham and Jeff Frost on California’s endless season of heat, for The Longest Year: 2020+ Project. | Lit Hub Photography Earl Swift considers what it was like to walk on the moon in […]
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Jul 20, 2021
Sara Martin on replacing the dead-end question “How much of the book is true?” with a far more interesting one: “How much of your life has been determined by fiction?” | Lit Hub “The rheumatologist commented, This doesn’t make sense, as in I’ve never before heard the story of this pain.” Rachel Yoder on navigating chronic pain through […]
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Jul 19, 2021
“I arrive now at the end of this journey with a finished film that I’ll happily admit cannot do justice to the well from which it’s drawn.” David Lowery on adapting The Green Night from a poem that resists adaptation. | Lit Hub Film Protective fragrances and plebian scents: Sarah Everts presents a brief history […]
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Jul 17, 2021
What Borges’ science fiction got right about the importance of forgetting, according to child psychiatry. | Lit Hub Science Searching for Moby-Dick (and the elusive truths of America’s pastime): Rick White goes deep on Bill James, Herman Melville, and the whaleness of Whiteyball. | Lit Hub Criticism “I said, ‘Oh, all right, but I’m not singing.’” Read an oral history of […]
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Jul 16, 2021
“Fire, that trickster’s loot, that gift from the gods, burned more than 4,000,000 acres of my home state last year—a number so vast it is mere abstraction.” Lauren Markham and Jeff Frost on California’s endless season of heat, for The Longest Year: 2020+ Project. | Lit Hub Photography Kristen Radtke on the process of translating her new graphic nonfiction […]
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Jul 15, 2021
“Fire, that trickster’s loot, that gift from the gods, burned more than 4,000,000 acres of my home state last year—a number so vast it is mere abstraction.” Lauren Markham and Jeff Frost on California’s endless season of heat, for The Longest Year: 2020+ Project. | Lit Hub Photography What Borges’ science fiction got right about […]
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Jul 14, 2021
“All I can think of is some of my idiotic statements in 200 newspapers.” Shirley Jackson writes to her parents about navigating literary fame, alongside with its infamous companion: financial insecurity. | Lit Hub Rae Nudson considers how makeup can strengthen the oppressed—like it did at Stonewall. | Lit Hub History It always comes back […]
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Jul 13, 2021
“A part of me still believes it isn’t possible to be a brown writer and also be funny and also be taken seriously. But I’ve taken the leap and put my name on this book.” Tahmima Anam on the serious business of being funny. | Lit Hub Searching for Moby-Dick (and the elusive truths of […]
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Jul 12, 2021
“I said, ‘Oh, all right, but I’m not singing.’” Read an oral history of the epically terrible Star Wars holiday special (which obviously achieved cult status after George Lucas tried to bury it). | Lit Hub Film Why Joyce Maynard’s new novel—the story of a writer-artist couple who fall in love, then fall apart—will sound […]
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Jul 10, 2021
The Great Second Half Preview is here, AKA 222 books we want to read before 2022. | Lit Hub From Shakespeare to Lovecraft to Stephen King, Austin Ratner on the glorious, wonderful, and prodigious literature of the rat (and no, a rat did not write this). | Lit Hub Criticism Deus ex machina with a credit card: Mikaella Clements […]
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Jul 09, 2021
In case you’ve forgotten how to socialize, here are 100 literary Jeopardy! clues to bust out in good company. | Lit Hub “Prison gang life eluded Charles Manson, and even if he could have fallen into it, he sure as shit wouldn’t have been a leader.” Legendary character actor Danny Trejo looks back at his […]
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Jul 08, 2021
From Shakespeare to Lovecraft to Stephen King, Austin Ratner tours the prodigious literature of rats (and the origins of his name). | Lit Hub Criticism “I am very aware that my house was once, and in many ways still is, someone else’s.” Emily Austin ponders grief and what the dead leave behind. | Lit Hub Indie booksellers recommend […]
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Jul 07, 2021
“I am painfully aware of every single thing that I need from music, embarrassed by what I ask of it.” Jessica Hopper on rock, rapture, and what artists do that mortals cannot. | Lit Hub Music Julia Baird on honoring the “dull, repetitive, unglamorous work” that comprises the middle years of activist movements. | Lit […]
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Jul 06, 2021
The Great Second Half Preview is here, AKA 220 books we want to read before 2022. | Lit Hub Queer genealogies: Why William di Canzio wrote a novel about Alec, the second half of the love affair in E.M. Forster’s Maurice. | Lit Hub “The enormity of what had happened was enough to convince everybody […]
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Jul 03, 2021
“That Barthelme had such a long and fruitful relationship with The New Yorker now seems remarkable, for he was in many ways the least likely New Yorker contributor ever.” Charles McGrath on the avant-garde genius of Donald Barthelme. | Lit Hub How Kurt Cobain’s favorite novel made its way onto Nirvana’s final album: Nathan Dunne on the seductive power of Patrick […]
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Jul 02, 2021
If “national characteristics don’t create national unity,” asks George Packer, what could? | Lit Hub Politics “I feel a defiance to those who would have me disappear.” Anita Sethi reclaims her existence in the wake of racial trauma. | Lit Hub Theodore R. Johnson considers the threat that racism poses to America, and the nation’s […]
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Jul 01, 2021
In the latest installment of The Longest Year: 2020+, Isadora Kosofsky documents an LA Covid ward, and Suzanne Koven reflects on treating patients in another ward across the country. | Lit Hub Photography Humans have shaped the evolution of wild animals—but that’s not wholly a bad thing, writes Emma Marris. | Lit Hub Nature The […]
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Jun 30, 2021
Lavinia Liang considers the “Eastern Western,” a growing body of literature that’s reclaiming a xenophobic genre. | Lit Hub Criticism “There are certain novels that have the remarkable quality of being both timely and prophetic.” Margot Livesy on Kathrine Kressmann Taylor’s Address Unknown, which exposed the dangers of Nazism. | Lit Hub How to respond […]
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Jun 29, 2021
“That Barthelme had such a long and fruitful relationship with The New Yorker now seems remarkable, for he was in many ways the least likely New Yorker contributor ever.” Charles McGrath on the avant-garde genius of Donald Barthelme. | Lit Hub Facial recognition and AI sleuths: Geoffrey Cain traces the rise of China’s state surveillance machinery. | Lit […]
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Jun 28, 2021
“In the vast majority of novels I read, nostalgia served as a harbinger for racism, and southern pride was a stand-in for white fragility.” Anjeli Enjeti on the unbearable whiteness of southern literature. | Lit Hub Criticism Hope, joy, and rage: a photo essay from Angela Rose Brussel, captured one year ago at Occupy City Hall […]
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Jun 25, 2021
“It’s a place for writers to publish and earn money directly and instantaneously without any traditional publishing gatekeepers. It’s also a brand-new subculture cut off from a larger writing culture that doesn’t understand it.” Walker Caplan on the writers using NFTs to make a living. | Lit Hub Hebe Uhart recounts the zoos he’s visited […]
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Jun 24, 2021
“I began to wonder: What if I directed my drawing and everything I knew about comic art to exploring the history and culture of Black America?” Charles Johnson on his journey to celebrated cartoonist. | Lit Hub Iconic blues musician Bobby Rush recalls getting burned (twice) by James Brown. | Lit Hub Music Boston Review […]
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Jun 23, 2021
What’s in an epigraph, anyway? Thomas Swick in praise of that “ceremonial gate.” | Lit Hub “Medicine needs to become actively antiracist.” Elinor Cleghorn on healthcare’s insidious race and gender problem. | Lit Hub Health How is it that we’re capable of imitating consciousness, yet we don’t understand what consciousness is? Stephen Marche considers AI, […]
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