Beta
X

Bookface Blog

RSS
May 13, 2021
We, the undersigned, call for an immediate halt to the Central Vista Redevelopment Project undertaken by the Indian government, which commenced in December 2020. The designation of this scheme as an “essential service” invites fresh scrutiny of the plan. It is especially troubling that this extravagant project is moving ahead in the midst of a […]
Read More
May 13, 2021
The best book deals of the day, curated by Book Riot.
Read More
May 13, 2021

A learned and readable picture of Renaissance medicine with less comic eccentricity than Robert Burton’s 1621 magnum opus

Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy is, as a brief preamble to this book puts it, “perhaps the largest, strangest and most unwieldy self-help book ever written”. I am not sure there is any “perhaps” about it. I can certainly attest to its unwieldiness, in the form of its one-volume NYRB edition: so thick as to be almost cubic, my first copy disintegrated as huge blocks of pages became unmoored from the spine; my second copy had to be left behind in a previous dwelling as it was simply too heavy for my luggage. Never mind, I thought: I’ll buy a digital version. Reader, be very careful about doing this: the Kindle edition I bought off the obvious online retailer may be weightless, but mine had been edited by an idiot, or an algorithm: I was terribly excited when I came across a sentence beginning “but we weave the equal internet nevertheless, twist the same rope time and again …” Did Burton, I wondered, coin the word “internet”, only for it to remain unused for centuries? The OED didn’t think so, and looking at the same passage in another online version I saw that the original word was “web”.

Anthony Burgess said it 'is, by a magnificent and somehow very English irony, one of the great comic works of the world'

Continue reading...
Read More
May 13, 2021
Can you experience nostalgia for a book you never read? One reader examines the development for a fandom through fan fiction.
Read More
May 13, 2021

The best books like Ted Lasso that read like a warm hug. Enjoy these cozy sports books and fish-out-of-water stories, including Running with Lions by Julian Winters.

Read More
May 13, 2021
Read More
May 13, 2021
Scrabble's list of playable words has evolved like language itself. Let's take a deep dive into the history of the Scrabble dictionary.
Read More
May 13, 2021

These new crime novels are guaranteed to entertain and chill you to your core. Add these new and upcoming releases to your TBR in 2021, including Lightseekers by Femi Kayode.

Read More
May 13, 2021
Watch characters fall in love through letters, tweets, and DMs in this roundup of epistolary romance novels.
Read More
May 13, 2021
Are you new to Helen Oyeyemi? Follow this reading pathway into the strange, uncanny, and surreal world of Oyeyemi's fiction.
Read More
May 13, 2021

These must-read Indian history books will help you understand this diverse country and its impact on the rest of the world, including The Raj at War by Yasmin Khan.

Read More
May 13, 2021
The best bookish gear for your literary lifestyle.

- Tirzah Price

Read More
May 13, 2021
The friendships in these heartfelt middle grade reads show both what a good friend should be and how to be one in return.
Read More
May 13, 2021

There’s a buzz to sharing your reading life, but for me it turned it into a kind of competition that distracts from what I love about books

I can’t remember the last time I enjoyed reading a book where my enjoyment wasn’t tied to the euphoric sense of achievement I got from finishing it. This is not because I don’t love reading, or would rather watch television. No, it’s because of a little app on my phone called Goodreads.

Home to about 90 million readers worldwide, Goodreads is a website that lets users track their reading and broadcast their tastes to the world – or, in my case, a few friends and vague acquaintances. At its core, it’s a harmless concept: an online community for bookworms, and an opportunity to discover new books your friends have loved.

Continue reading...
Read More
May 13, 2021
“I am delighted to finally read Austen, but you cannot make me drink tea.” How a pandemic reading project turned Josh Raff into a Janeite—and why it took him so long to get there. | Lit Hub Martha C. Nussbaum on the “big, borderless workplace” of the art world, which lets abusers believe their genius […]
Read More
May 13, 2021
The senators are on opposite sides of the aisle, but both speak out on the dangers of big tech in their new books. It’s weird, really, how alike they sound.
Read More
May 13, 2021
In “Amazon Unbound,” his second book about the company, Brad Stone focuses on its singular C.E.O.
Read More
May 13, 2021
Bruce D. Perry talks about what it’s like to write a book with a co-author who needs no introduction.
Read More
May 13, 2021
Largely unrecognized during her lifetime, the 20th-century Italian actress turned writer is now considered a feminist icon. Her novel “Meeting in Positano” is being published in English for the first time.
Read More
May 13, 2021
“But as I’m approaching the appropriate age, my inability to carry a tune remains a stumbling block, so my dream appears unlikely to be realized.”
Read More
May 13, 2021
Sitting. Just sitting. That’s what it’s called. A somewhat unusual, perhaps unnatural activity, but arguably no less bizarre than many of the things we’re embroiled-in and busy-with, over the course of a life. Between birth and dying: that mercurial stretch. Ours and not-ours. Impersonal and intimate. You sit for no one, and for no quality […]
Read More
May 13, 2021
I came to Jane Austen late. As a lifelong reader, I do not have a simple explanation for this omission, but when my family decided to read Pride and Prejudice as a family reading project soon after the pandemic forced us into isolation, I jumped at the chance to fill in the gap in my […]
Read More
May 13, 2021
I died and then found myself walking across a large, green field. You might think heaven would be overflowing with rare flowers and exotic birds, but this meadow was just plain city grass mixed with dandelions. Some taller weeds grew along the periphery, where the mower hadn’t been able to reach. A few sparrows and […]
Read More
May 13, 2021
My wife Louise had spontaneously volunteered to take a peacock from our friend Danielle because a peacock, in a fundamental sense, is not a bird that one possesses so much as experiences; as with an especially moving work of art, the simple act of looking at it will stir emotions. A peacock, she imagined, would […]
Read More
May 13, 2021
In the fall of 2011, I spent the better part of a month living in Berlin, trying to finish writing a novel while caught up emotionally in the historical whirlwind centering on that most fateful of cities. My great-grandmother and her daughters lived in Berlin in the first half of the 20th century; one of […]
Read More
Page 5 of 249 [5]