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Jun 29, 2020
This year the questions come up again with a vengeance: What is the role of artists in a crisis? Writers ask, what does my work mean in this larger emergency? Does my personal creativity matter in the vast public sphere? And most immediately, how do I navigate this meltdown? When the economy collapsed in 1929, […]
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Jun 29, 2020
Not long ago, while backpacking with my wife through South America, we traveled to San Pedro de Atacama, an adobe oasis village on the eastern edge of Chile’s vast northern desert. After we arrived, to get a sense of our surroundings, we hired bikes and cycled for seven miles into a sandstone canyon called the […]
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Jun 29, 2020
I dedicated my 1981 book Man Bites Man: Two Decades of Satiric Art to “Three Masters of the Comic Arts: Art Young, Gluyas Williams and Otto Soglow.” If today I were instructed to only make one dedication (to save on typesetting costs, perhaps?), I would definitely choose Art Young. He is genuinely still a huge inspiration […]
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Jun 29, 2020
There are two polling places in Haines, Alaska. One is in the arts center lobby, on the hill above the harbor and cruise ship dock, the other at the fire hall in Mosquito Lake, a woodsy rural settlement 26 miles out of town. I voted at the arts center and said hi to everyone as I […]
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Jun 29, 2020
Due to coronavirus concerns, the NCAA canceled its college basketball tournament in March. Shortly after that, the NBA and NHL postponed all games indefinitely. Major League Baseball, still in spring training at the time, has not yet begun its 2020 season. Which brings us once more to the solution to most problems: books. While ESPN […]
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Jun 29, 2020
Annette Kellerman emerged at just the right moment—as the rising popularity of women’s swimming competitions was colliding with the ridiculous encumbrances of Victorian morality—and she had the moxie and entrepreneurial savvy to smash two centuries of prudery to pieces and come out rich and happy on the other end. Born in Sydney, Australia, in 1886, […]
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Jun 29, 2020
I never thought I would run for office. For 20 years, I had been an activist pushing for change from the outside. I had used every tool I could think of in my toolbox to advocate for positive changes on issues from immigration to environmental justice to economic inequality. I had led voter registration drives, […]
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Jun 29, 2020
Watching Sara Fattahi’s films is reminiscent of the experience of reading the stories of Gabriel García Márquez, the Colombian novelist known for his multi-generational family tales told through a magical realist lens. Sara’s films are intimately told narrative accounts from inside the households of her female relatives and female friends. The penetrating shots and closely-lensed […]
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Jun 27, 2020
The coronavirus pandemic is dramatically disrupting not only our daily lives but society itself. This show features conversations with some of the world’s leading thinkers and writers about the deeper economic, political, and technological consequences of the pandemic. It’s our new daily podcast trying to make longterm sense out of the chaos of today’s global […]
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Jun 27, 2020
Letters from protests across the country: From Vermont, Major Jackson on defending that “part of Black life you don’t actually see” • Indigo Moore on poetry and protest in Sacramento. | Lit Hub Politics “I don’t think it’s a moral issue when people decide to be reclusive and anti-social. Why should anyone have to participate in this […]
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Jun 26, 2020
During a virtual town hall last night, as a group of four friends were discussing what it was like to work as people of color in publishing, I thought of the things I’d valued blindly in elementary and high school, to say nothing of college. I grew up with my mother’s side of the family […]
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Jun 26, 2020
If you haven’t read “The Lottery” lately, there’s never been a better time—especially if you, like me, enjoy feeling like you’re hearing your favorite dead writers weigh in on world events. Tomorrow is also the day the story’s titular lottery takes place each year, in case you need an extra nudge. Smarter writers than I […]
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Jun 26, 2020
Because “queerdom is vast and diverse and so are the novels,” Rabih Alameddine recommends some gay books you might not have known were gay. | Lit Hub Leigh Stein social listening, online posturing, and the (fake) language of white capitalist feminism. | Lit Hub Remembering the words of Bo Huston, who bore witness to the […]
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Jun 26, 2020
Drew and Christopher chat with Hilary Leichter in three different Damn Libraries for another first of its kind digital episode—our first Zoom guest! We discuss Hilary’s novel Temporary which leads to talk about things like gig work, her love of pirates, and how the book started as a short story. And we delivered her drink […]
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Jun 26, 2020
It’s that time of the year. Happy pride, everyone… yadda, yadda, yadda. Now, let’s bring out the books. Allow me to recommend ten novels that aren’t the first thing that pop up when people think gay. Most of us tend to come up with the same books when we think of queer literature even though […]
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Jun 26, 2020
“Social listening” is a marketing surveillance tactic used by brands to listen to their customers on social media. It’s Eavesdropping 2.0. The skincare brand Drunk Elephant uses social listening in the comments section of their Instagram posts, to respond to customer questions about product “smoothies.” Uber Eats says, “You asked for a way to find […]
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Jun 26, 2020
Featuring the good news and the bad news from the week in books, the big titles everyone is talking about, the best reviewed books, adaptation news, and more… From Book Marks editors Dan Sheehan and Katie Yee. Discussed in this episode: · Upcoming novels from George R. R. Martin and Don DeLillo · The ghost in Katie’s […]
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Jun 26, 2020
When Haboo was first published 35 years ago, the dramatic art of traditional storytelling in many of our Native American communities was fading as younger generations became more adapted to mainstream culture and values. Recognizing the impact of cultural change taking place in their communities, my grandmother—like so many other elders—sought to gather and preserve […]
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Jun 26, 2020
In the final years of his life—a cruel phrase, really, as he only lived to 33—the writer Bo Huston made several trips to Zurich for experimental AIDS treatments. In his downtime there, between appointments, he read Christopher Isherwood and Patricia Highsmith, slept, and went for walks to fill the days. Huston had left Ohio years […]
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Jun 26, 2020
Everything I needed to know about writing and editing a novel I learned by photographing a dumb brown bag.  I teach photography and I also write but I don’t separate the two disciplines. Photography and writing are both conjuring arts, they share the communicative tricks and troubles of sequencing scenes, stopping and pacing time, framing […]
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Jun 26, 2020
New York City deserves an equitable budget, one that prioritizes social services, infrastructure, education, housing and cultural activity over law enforcement. Mayor de Blasio must use his financial powers to support initiatives that counter policy brutality and improve equity for Black people. Part of this work should include supporting and uplifting the city’s literary community. […]
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Jun 26, 2020
a woman precedes me up the long rope, her dangling braids the color of rain. maybe I should have had braids. maybe I should have kept the body I started, slim and possible as a boy’s bone. maybe I should have wanted less. maybe I should have ignored the bowl in me burning to be […]
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Jun 26, 2020
The whole morning, while practicing a Scelsi piece – his Fourth String Quartet, to be precise – I kept glancing at the wax-plant flowers that had opened during the night. The white and pink blossoms hung in clusters and looked like tiny little eyes watching over me: a little audience from another species, I thought […]
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Jun 25, 2020
The coronavirus pandemic is dramatically disrupting not only our daily lives but society itself. This show features conversations with some of the world’s leading thinkers and writers about the deeper economic, political, and technological consequences of the pandemic. It’s our new daily podcast trying to make longterm sense out of the chaos of today’s global […]
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Jun 25, 2020
“I don’t think it’s a moral issue when people decide to be reclusive and anti-social. Like, why should anyone have to participate in this society?” Ottessa Moshfegh on isolation, self-awareness, and cancel culture. | Lit Hub “Why do I have to be the interpreter of this moment? Because I wrote a few books?” Mariana Enriquez […]
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