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Jul 12, 2021
It is strange to have as my subject freedom to write coming from an island which, for a quarter of its modern history, was a slave society. Though there were major differences, the literature of the era abounds with comparisons between the convict society of Van Diemen’s Land and the slave societies of the Americas. […]
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Jul 12, 2021
Throughout much of 1978, things were ramping up behind the scenes in terms of bringing The Empire Strikes Back to the big screen. Ralph McQuarrie was working on a variety of illustrations that would ultimately be brought to life while George Lucas and Lawrence Kasdan were revising the screenplay. There were other elements coming into […]
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Jul 12, 2021
The bride wears black. An atmosphere of momentous occasion permeates Room 315 at the Rodeway Inn, nestled between two highways outside Salem, Oregon. It’s the morning of the wedding. Mary Kay cosmetics, SnackWell’s popcorn, errant shoes, and water bottles are strewn across the room, where the bride awoke at four this morning, ready for her […]
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Jul 12, 2021
This cold. I don’t know what to do about this cold. I lie down on my sleeping pad and wrap myself in the tarp, but I cannot rest. If only I hadn’t lost my sleeping bag! Each time I succeed in gathering the tarp around me, the wind tears it away again, pulling it open […]
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Jul 12, 2021
It occurred to me the other day that I’ve been doing the thing I’m doing right now—sitting at my desk, hands on a keyboard, telling a story—for more years than I’ve done just about anything else in my life. Longer than I was my parents’ child, longer than I was married to my children’s father, […]
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Jul 12, 2021
Icelandic authors write for an audience of roughly 360,000 people. They are, in many ways, hopeless romantics, writing in a tiny tongue that both matters immensely and not at all. If these authors had spent any time studying economics, it would’ve been obvious that it doesn’t pay to invest time and effort writing in Icelandic; […]
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Jul 12, 2021
The Popol Wuj (also written as Popol Vuh and Pop Wuj), the “Book of the Community,” was written between 1554 and 1558 and is one of the most important K’iche’ Maya books in the history of the Mayab’ region—present day Southern Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and northern El Salvador. Some scholars believe that the authors […]
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Jul 12, 2021
Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world’s leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Peter Sterling, the author of What Is Health?: Allostasis and the Evolution of Human Design, to discuss […]
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Jul 12, 2021
Emergence Magazine is a quarterly online publication exploring the threads connecting ecology, culture, and spirituality. As we experience the desecration of our lands and waters, the extinguishing of species, and a loss of sacred connection to the Earth, we look to emerging stories. Each issue explores a theme through innovative digital media, as well as […]
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Jul 10, 2021
The Great Second Half Preview is here, AKA 222 books we want to read before 2022. | Lit Hub From Shakespeare to Lovecraft to Stephen King, Austin Ratner on the glorious, wonderful, and prodigious literature of the rat (and no, a rat did not write this). | Lit Hub Criticism Deus ex machina with a credit card: Mikaella Clements […]
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Jul 09, 2021
S. A. Cosby’s Razorblade Tears, Dana Spiotta’s Wayward, Helen Scales’ The Brilliant Abyss, and Michael Pollan’s This is Your Mind on Plants all feature among the Best Reviewed Books of the Week. Brought to you by Book Marks, Lit Hub’s “Rotten Tomatoes for books.”   Fiction 1. Razorblade Tears by S. A. Cosby (Flatiron) 9 […]
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Jul 09, 2021
Good news for Twainiacs (?) with money to spend: now, for $4.2 million, you can purchase Mark Twain (aka Samuel Clemens)’s bright yellow Redding, Connecticut mansion where he lived until his death in 1910. Stormfield Mansion, named by Twain himself after his short story “Captain Stormfield’s Visit to Heaven,” was built in the style of […]
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Jul 09, 2021
If you like your children’s cartoon characters vaguely sinister and uncomfortably sexualized (and I do, perverted Parisian Judge Claude Frollo and suave 1970s fox Robin Hood. God help me, I do), you’ll find this news very welcome indeed. Large, handsome, Oscar-winning Spaniard Javier Bardem is set to star as the titular crocodile in a musical […]
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Jul 09, 2021
If you watched Gilmore Girls for the first time when it was still on air and never stopped watching it, then this list is for you. Personally, I probably think about the Gilmore girls an unhealthy number of times per day, and my obsession is only aided by following my like-minded fanatics on the Internet like […]
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Jul 09, 2021
This week, I stumbled across a hidden internet gem: a seemingly endless collection of fake pulp novel covers for, about, and presumably by, librarians. The series, “Professional Library Literature: Practical Books for Librarians” is a hilarious mix of helpful how-to guides, library-related thrillers, and other useful (and cathartic) topics. (As someone who worked for several […]
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Jul 09, 2021
This weekend will mark the birthday of celebrated author Elwyn Brooks White, otherwise known as E.B. White to the public and “Andy” to his close friends. White was born on July 11, 1899, in Mount Vernon, NY. In 1921, he graduated from Cornell University, where he earned his BA. He earned the nickname “Andy” while […]
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Jul 09, 2021
At long last, Paulo Coelho’s The Alchemist—international bestseller, Guinness World Record holder (for most translated work by a living author), inspirational parable, and um, favorite novel of everyone you know who doesn’t really read novels—is coming to the big screen. First published in Portuguese by Brazilian writer Paulo Coelho in 1988, The Alchemist tells the story […]
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Jul 09, 2021
In case you’ve forgotten how to socialize, here are 100 literary Jeopardy! clues to bust out in good company. | Lit Hub “Prison gang life eluded Charles Manson, and even if he could have fallen into it, he sure as shit wouldn’t have been a leader.” Legendary character actor Danny Trejo looks back at his […]
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Jul 09, 2021
Some endings of works of fiction provoke the reader to look back and see the story in quite a different light. The effect of these “endings that change everything,” as I’m calling them, is to radically enlarge a given story while at the same time resolving it. The ones I’ve read—and these are rare, to […]
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Jul 09, 2021
When the Berlin Wall fell, Jenny Erpenbeck was sleeping. “I spent that evening with friends,” the acclaimed German writer remembers in an essay from Not a Novel: A Memoir in Pieces (translated by Kurt Beals), “just a few blocks from where world history was being made, and then: I slept.” This sense of being present […]
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Jul 09, 2021
I had boxed in every institution I had ever been in, from juvie to Jamestown, so by the time I got to San Quentin I had a reputation, especially among the Mexicans. The word was, “Oh, fuck yeah! We got a champ.” They had fights every month, so I started training in the gym, where […]
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Jul 09, 2021
In the notoriously opaque publishing industry, it’s rare to find a clear, no-bullshit, here’s-how-to-do-it voice standing in the midst of it all. Everyone, meet Anne Trubek, founder of Belt Publishing. Belt Publishing’s mission began in 2013 with the publication of several anthologies that focused on various cities throughout the Rust Belt and Midwest—from Milwaukee to […]
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Jul 09, 2021
It’s officially time to socialize again. But maybe . . . you’ve forgotten how? Here’s one way to break the ice/pass the time/celebrate your vaccinations with your book-reading friends: organize a day of literary Jeopardy!. (You can also just play by yourself, right here, right now.) To facilitate, I combed through this insane archive of […]
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Jul 09, 2021
At age 18, running felt most visceral and primal in all its power, simplicity, and purity. As we grow older, we act for purpose rather than for pleasure, geared perhaps toward achieving a reward or trinket like lab rats pushing a lever for a food pellet. Pandering to that model, running in races used to […]
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Jul 09, 2021
When I decided to write a book about chemistry in our everyday life, I knew I needed a chapter about happy hour. Now, as I write, bars are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Still, there’s no better way to end the day than hanging out with friends, telling stories, and buying cheap drinks. On […]
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