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Jul 16, 2021
The American Booksellers Association has made their Twitter account private after promoting a scientifically inaccurate anti-trans book, apologizing, and then deleting the apology. The controversy started when the ABA, as part of their July “white box” promotional mailing, sent 750 bookstores a copy of freelance journalist Abigail Shrier’s Irreversible Damage: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our […]
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Jul 16, 2021
“I was surrounded by phonies…They were coming in the goddam window.” 70 years ago today, The Catcher in the Rye first hit bookshelves across the US, and people still have some pretty strong opinions about J. D. Salinger’s groundbreaking debut. Die-hard fans and rabid haters are legion. Indeed, of all the mid-century American novels to […]
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Jul 16, 2021
Sunjeev Sahota’s China Room, Matt Bell’s Appleseed, Anuk Arudpragasam’s A Passage North, Kristen Radtke’s Seek You, and The Letters of Shirley Jackson all feature among the Best Reviewed Books of the Week. Brought to you by Book Marks, Lit Hub’s “Rotten Tomatoes for books.”   Fiction 1. China Room by Sunjeev Sahota (Viking) 7 Rave • […]
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Jul 16, 2021
We’ve known since March that FX has given a pilot order to Kindred, a series adaptation of Octavia Butler’s 1979 novel of the same name. Playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins—Pulitzer Prize finalist, MacArthur fellow, and consulting producer on HBO’s Watchmen—wrote the pilot, and is set to executive produce alongside Courtney Lee-Mitchell (The Reluctant Fundamentalist), Darren Aronofsky (Black […]
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Jul 16, 2021
Colin Kaepernick—the activist quarterback blackballed by the NFL for kneeling during the national anthem at the start of games in protest of police brutality and racial inequality—is releasing a children’s book inspired by a pivotal moment in his childhood. I Color Myself Different, the first picture book in a multi-book deal between Kaepernick Publishing and […]
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Jul 16, 2021
The English language is an ever-changing, sometimes confounding entity. The good folks at Dictionary.com are all too aware of this fact and have recently added over 300 new words and updated definitions to the website. The latest update follows this spring’s inclusion of 450 brand-new entries, 7,600 updated entries, and 94 new definitions on existing […]
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Jul 16, 2021
Back in April, A24 and Rhombus Media optioned the rights to Viet Thanh Nguyen’s The Sympathizer, Nguyen’s Pulitzer-winning debut novel about a half-French, half-Vietnamese army captain who serves as a communist double agent after the fall of Saigon. The novel is being adapted into a limited series directed by Park Chan-wook (The Handmaiden, Oldboy). Now, […]
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Jul 16, 2021
Late to the party yet again, I recently saw Shawshank Redemption for the very first time. For those of you who have been living under an adjacent rock, it’s a movie based on Stephen King’s novella, starring Morgan Freeman and Tim Robbins, who play Red and Andy, two men serving lengthy sentences in a high-security […]
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Jul 16, 2021
In honor of the 70th publication anniversary of The Catcher in the Rye, I was planning to write the definitive essay on the novel’s place in the canon, but then I remembered that no discourse in the world bores me as much as Books You Read in High School Discourse and I decided to write […]
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Jul 16, 2021
“Fire, that trickster’s loot, that gift from the gods, burned more than 4,000,000 acres of my home state last year—a number so vast it is mere abstraction.” Lauren Markham and Jeff Frost on California’s endless season of heat, for The Longest Year: 2020+ Project. | Lit Hub Photography Kristen Radtke on the process of translating her new graphic nonfiction […]
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Jul 16, 2021
In recent years I have grown to love audiobooks; I might love listening to an audiobook just as much—or sometimes even more—than reading a book on the page in front of me. I spend a great deal of time listening to them while I draw my own books, books that will mostly never become audiobooks […]
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Jul 16, 2021
A contributor to Conjunctions since the second issue in 1982, William H. Gass (1924–2017) was a fiction writer, essayist, and critic. His works of fiction include Omensetter’s Luck, In the Heart of the Heart of the Country, and The Tunnel, as well as many essay collections. Gass was recipient of numerous honors, including the PEN/Nabokov […]
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Jul 16, 2021
In 1987, a widely overlooked book, Abortion and the Constitution: Reversing Roe v. Wade Through the Courts, laid out the primary legal strategy abortion opponents would pursue for decades. These fervent anti-abortion attorneys, brought together by Americans United for Life, the leading anti-abortion legal group, recognized that the reversal of Roe would take careful planning […]
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Jul 16, 2021
Henri Desgrange watched the celebrations pass by on rue du Faubourg Montmartre. Crowds renewed themselves along the blister of a road through Paris’s ninth arrondissement, on the Seine’s right bank. The editor stood, stiff. His soldier’s posture had not yet left him. When he’d held his unit’s colors, his face set for the army photographer, […]
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Jul 16, 2021
At four in the morning, the alarm went off. The thermometer read −35°C. There was something profoundly rash about getting out of a sleeping bag. In order not to suffer from the cold in such conditions meant being organized. Every movement had to correspond to a single note: find a glove, lace one’s boots inside […]
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Jul 16, 2021
On May 29, 2017, I held a press conference at the Tokyo District Court. The purpose of the press conference was to publicize my appeal to the Committee for the Inquest of the Prosecution to reopen the investigation in the report I filed claiming to have been raped, which the Public Prosecutor’s Office had decided […]
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Jul 16, 2021
In my novel A Touch of Jen, one of the characters, Alicia, builds a personal relaxation module—A Spod (spa+pod), a self-enclosed space that satisfies all her needs and will enable her to become her best self. This fantasy of engineering a perfect, controlled environment is both Utopian and narcissistic. It animates the work of one […]
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Jul 16, 2021
In October 2016, when the US presidential contest between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump dominated headlines in newspapers across the globe, a quieter political revolution was afoot a continent away, in Rio de Janeiro. At its center: an election for Rio city council. Among its candidates: an unknown 37-year-old political activist named Marielle Franco. Marielle […]
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Jul 16, 2021
King of the Distant Isles, Galehaut, King also of Norgales; Overlord of the North Marches and Escavalon; Master in Lothian, Gore, the Long Isles, Sorestan; King in Orofoise, Roestoc, Pomitain, the Isle of Servage, the Straight Marches, Stranggore; Duke of Sorelois, Garloth, and twenty more besides. Now in Tintagel, afterward in Joyous Garde; lover of […]
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Jul 15, 2021
“Fire, that trickster’s loot, that gift from the gods, burned more than 4,000,000 acres of my home state last year—a number so vast it is mere abstraction.” Lauren Markham and Jeff Frost on California’s endless season of heat, for The Longest Year: 2020+ Project. | Lit Hub Photography What Borges’ science fiction got right about […]
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Jul 15, 2021
The Longest Year: 2020+ is a collection of visual and written essays on 2020, a pivotal year that shifted our way of experiencing the world. In most publications, images work in service to words—here they work in tandem.  //  California residents Jeff Frost—a photographer—and Lauren Markham—a writer—reckon here with that state’s ever-lengthening fire season, documenting […]
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Jul 15, 2021
 On weekends my mom drove us to art classes, even on Saturday mornings, even to the other side of town, even in the middle of winter when the streets were covered in snow. In my very first memory of painting, the teacher held up a laminated print of Van Gogh’s Starry Night. She scattered orange […]
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Jul 15, 2021
It was a warm evening in early summer, and the end of my junior year in college, when I handed my friend Audrey a silver, full-face motorcycle helmet and told her to “go with the turns.” Audrey fit nicely onto the back of my scooter, a vehicle that had recently replaced my rusted-out Jeep Wrangler, […]
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Jul 15, 2021
I’m a weird alcoholic. I don’t fit the stereotypes. There was no single “trigger” that would set me off on a binge. Not a sad anniversary, not a time of the day, not going to a party. It was all of those things, and none of them. I didn’t ever drink more if I pitched […]
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Jul 15, 2021
Photographs seem to suggest the possibility of stillness. Of our stillness—as completion. As arrival. That’s because what’s most conspicuously presented isn’t really the subject itself (a painting, after all, does that) so much as the act, the singular fact, of observation. The beholding. The suggestion thus extending to the lens and the photographer whose place […]
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