Beta
X

Bookface Blog

RSS
Archive by category: UncategorizedReturn
Jul 21, 2021
Reginald Dwayne Betts is the guest. His new poetry collection, Felon, is out now from W.W. Norton & Company. From the episode: Brad Listi: For listeners who are new to you and your work, it might be helpful to get a brief biographical overview. Reginald Dwayne Betts: Yeah, I hate biographies, right? It’s interesting. I […]
Read More
Jul 21, 2021
This is Thresholds, a series of conversations with writers about experiences that completely turned them upside down, disoriented them in their lives, changed them, and changed how and why they wanted to write. Hosted by Jordan Kisner, author of the new essay collection, Thin Places, and brought to you by Lit Hub Radio. In this episode, Jordan […]
Read More
Jul 21, 2021
In this week’s episode, Kendra and Sumaiyya discuss Isabella Hamad’s The Parisian and Susan Abulhawa’s Against the Loveless World. On The Parisian:  Sumaiyya: There’s this propaganda about Palestine not existing before Israel was formed. But this book is basically showing you that, look, this nation existed. There were all these people who lived there and […]
Read More
Jul 21, 2021
Each week on NewberyTart, Jennie and Marcy, two book-loving mamas (and a librarian and a bookseller, respectively), read and drink their way through the entire catalogue of Newbery books, and interview authors and illustrators along the way. In this episode, Marcy and Jennie talk about the 1983 Newbery Honor book, Doctor De Soto by William […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
Sara Martin on replacing the dead-end question “How much of the book is true?” with a far more interesting one: “How much of your life has been determined by fiction?” | Lit Hub “The rheumatologist commented, This doesn’t make sense, as in I’ve never before heard the story of this pain.” Rachel Yoder on navigating chronic pain through […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
Another Tuesday, another pile of books we can’t wait to get our hands on. What’re you waiting for?! Drop everything, and head on over to your local indie. On your (book)mark, get set, read! * Katie Kitamura, Intimacies (Riverhead) “…cooly written and casts a spell … Few novelists write so astringently about how we misread […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
Deep in the summer of 2020 quarantine, the pain began. Physical and uncontrolled, this pain flared extraordinarily, red-hot and throbbing on a daily basis, in whatever place in my body it pleased, then stayed for months and months. The rheumatologist commented, This doesn’t make sense, as in I’ve never before heard the story of this […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
Speech is a form of power. My new book, The Man Who Hated Women: Sex, Censorship, & Civil Liberties in the Gilded Age, chronicles eight women “sex radicals” who went up against the restrictive 19th-century federal Comstock law—named after the obscenity fighter Anthony Comstock—which criminalized the mailing and selling of contraceptives with harsh sentences and […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
The first hurricane of the season moves up the coast then swerves away. The swell is minor and the winds are howling, but I drive “down the shore,” as they say in New Jersey, curious to see how a certain spot is reacting and just to stand close to the storm energy. The sky streams […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
Now Susan Sontag was famous among certain people—you know who I mean—urban informed culturally literate East Coast people and some West a few in Chicago in Europe and elsewhere although Susan Sontag came from Arizona which is remarkable only if you hold certain prejudices about Arizona which I do having been there twice and disliking […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
I wish I could tell my younger self, the college student taking women’s studies classes and attending Take Back the Night marches, that in middle age I’d become the unlikely defender of Playboy Bunnies. This all started when I was dreaming up backstory for one of the side characters in a new novel I was […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
When my husband got a teaching job at NYU Abu Dhabi, I found the best way to meet new people in our apartment complex was in the pool. One day I swam up to a gaggle of expat women talking about how they would never have agreed to move to the Middle East if they […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
Rarely is a fiction reading or interview with a novelist complete until the question, “how much of the book is true?” gets asked. Over the years this question has baffled me to the point of irritation; it feels like a dead-end curiosity that doesn’t challenge the writer to investigate their creation nor inspire readers to […]
Read More
Jul 20, 2021
The highway from Homs to Damascus, spindly and unlit and lined with squat concrete barricades, was deserted but for the five buses speeding southward, past the purple-green olive groves and the terraced desert. Still, the passengers hunkered low in their seats. Some checked soccer scores on their phones and carried on quiet conversations with their […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
The AKO Caine Prize for African Writing is a literature prize awarded to an African writer of a short story published in English. The prize was launched in 2000 to encourage and highlight the richness and diversity of African writing by bringing it to a wider audience internationally. The focus on the short story reflects the […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
“I arrive now at the end of this journey with a finished film that I’ll happily admit cannot do justice to the well from which it’s drawn.” David Lowery on adapting The Green Night from a poem that resists adaptation. | Lit Hub Film Protective fragrances and plebian scents: Sarah Everts presents a brief history […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
Somewhere near the border of California and Arizona, in the predawn light, two men are talking about cabbage. One is tall, tan, a strapping guy in a flannel shirt with the look of a rancher. I’ll call him the Rancher. Probably midsixties. The other is an older Chinese American man. He’s reading a book called […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
The following is from the foreword to The Green Knight. What was I thinking when I wrote this? I knew what I was getting myself into when I wrote that line, and at one point even omitted it from the screenplay for fear that it was simply too brazen. But some brew of hubris and humor […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
The attorney general was cornered. It was July 2020, and Bill Barr was testifying before the House Judiciary Committee. Months earlier, in February 2020, he had taken the jaw-dropping step of publicly undercutting the sentencing recommendation made by Justice Department prosecutors who had tried and convicted Roger Stone, a longtime political ally and advisor to […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
Oscar Wilde’s ship docked in New York Harbor on the evening of January 2, 1882, one week before he was scheduled to speak at Chickering Hall. During the crossing he had composed his first lecture, but the journalists who swarmed onto the ship as it lay at anchor off Staten Island were more interested in […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
For most of human history, we’ve used perfume to modify the scent of our bodies. When I say “our,” I mean our wealthy predecessors: Most historical documentation reports on the lives of the rich and powerful. And the rich certainly enjoyed a perfumed past. Depending on the era and the location, we occasionally bathed our […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
New Yorkers have a different notion of the Bronx than most outsiders. They know it as being the only borough that is part of the American mainland, and that it is pastoral as well as urban. It got its name from the Swedish immigrant Jonas Bronck who settled a farm on Wappinger tribe land leased […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
Croatian culture has dealt with the fate of the Jews in WWII in sporadic fashion. If and when the subject was considered, it was always in a wider, European context, while locally, our own Holocaust was avoided like a dirty conscience. Aside from individual documentary accounts and testimonies of the survivors, the subject of the […]
Read More
Jul 19, 2021
Testosterone and related androgens (and also estrogen) direct the body’s energy to be used to build up molecules and tissues, while other hormones, like cortisol and adrenaline, break down tissues and molecules to free up energy to fuel working muscles, among many other functions. Growing and remodeling the tissues of a boy into those of […]
Read More
Jul 17, 2021
What Borges’ science fiction got right about the importance of forgetting, according to child psychiatry. | Lit Hub Science Searching for Moby-Dick (and the elusive truths of America’s pastime): Rick White goes deep on Bill James, Herman Melville, and the whaleness of Whiteyball. | Lit Hub Criticism “I said, ‘Oh, all right, but I’m not singing.’” Read an oral history of […]
Read More
Page 2 of 90 [2]