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Aug 05, 2021
This week on The Maris Review, Kelsey McKinney joins Maris Kreizman to discuss her new novel, God Spare the Girls, out now from William Morrow & Co. * On leaving the church: KM: What was interesting for me about growing up and growing out of the faith that I grew up in was recognizing that […]
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Aug 05, 2021
Mona Awad’s question for any writer on the precipice of giving up, plus more advice from the author of All’s Well. | Lit Hub Craft Rachel Kushner in praise of the Gun Club’s Mother Juno and the richness of Mexican-American punk rock. | Lit Hub Music “No one wants to appear weak or disturb the […]
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Aug 05, 2021
Two days after his disappearance, when his ex‑wife’s anxious questions began to circulate on social media, his friends all agreed that Sandoval, after saying goodbye to us, had gone to see his new girlfriend, an indefatigable twenty-something with tattooed ankles he’d been going out with for a few months, and it wasn’t improbable that the […]
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Aug 04, 2021
“Driving around the mountain roads, I could hear the quiet around me, and it sounded like the foreboding, slinky, synthesizer-filled theme song to Twin Peaks.” Stephen Kurczy visits the “Log Lady” of the Quiet Zone. | Lit Hub American policing is operating exactly as it was designed to, writes Philip V. McHarris: “a violent tool of race and […]
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Aug 04, 2021
Still in his pajamas, Bob Sheets turned on his kitchen griddle and whisked up a bowl of blueberry pancake batter. I had come to debrief. The Sheetses were becoming my guides to better understanding the Quiet Zone, and my head was spinning. I had come to Green Bank on the presumption that the less connected […]
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Aug 04, 2021
Robert Macfarlane, high chieftan of logophiles everywhere, has dedicated entire books, including 2015’s Landmarks and 2017’s The Lost Words, which he co-authored with Jackie Morris, to preserving words and their original meanings. That’s why the Old English word wyrd might be the best term to describe the origins of his beautiful friendship and subsequent collaboration […]
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Aug 04, 2021
Dominant power structures have institutionalized the idea that police are the only legitimate providers of public safety—which subsequently justifies their attempts to monopolize the use of violence. For most of history, however, police were not seen in that way. Rather, police were often considered as violent tools serving the interest of those in power, something […]
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Aug 04, 2021
Among my favorite book genres is histories of 19th‑century polar expeditions (spoiler alert: it’s super, super cold and a lot of people die). My husband, Jesse, and I share many interests, but not this one. The last time I read one of these books and tried to tell him what was happening, he retaliated by […]
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Aug 04, 2021
In this week’s episode, Kendra and Sachi discuss books around this month’s theme of Nature Writing. Tune into the podcast to listen to their full, enthusiastic recommendations! From the episode: Kendra: I think the way that humankind undervalues nature connects with how we undervalue nature writing. This is something that I’m looking into; it’s not […]
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Aug 04, 2021
Dan Akerson did not want to be spotted driving around Detroit in a Tesla Model S. But by the middle of 2013, the chief executive of General Motors needed to know what all of the fuss was about over the electric sedan named Motor Trend Car of the Year—the title the Chevrolet Volt, GM’s own […]
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Aug 04, 2021
Since biblical times, Lebanon has been seen as a beacon by the peoples of the Orient, by invaders from the East as well as those living in desert oases or in Palestine or Mesopotamia. It was the only known mountainous region, whose summits were said to bring men closer to the gods, or to the […]
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Aug 04, 2021
I am the last nomad. How can I be the last one? Nomads still exist in that faraway desert where I grew up, so how can I make such a bold statement? What I am really trying to say is, I am the last person in my direct line to have once lived like that, […]
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Aug 04, 2021
Many years ago my husband Fred, primarily a financial news and nonfiction reader, was heading off on a work trip and decided to take along one of my favorite novels of all time, I Know This Much Is True by Wally Lamb. He knew how important the book was to me and decided to finally […]
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Aug 03, 2021
Your August literary film and TV watchlist features Hot Priest recast as Lord Merlin, Sandra Oh as the chair of an English department, some truly bonkers CGI, and more. | Lit Hub TV A whiskey highball for Carson McCullers, plus other signature cocktails—and scents—of famous authors. | Lit Hub “Praying itself is an act of […]
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Aug 03, 2021
The good news came in late January, six months before the publication of my debut memoir. Audio rights had sold to Dreamscape. In recent years, most titles by W.W. Norton and similar-sized publishers have become audiobooks, so my editor’s email wasn’t entirely unexpected. The line of her message that gave me pause came at the […]
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Aug 03, 2021
Every month, all the major streaming services add a host of newly acquired (or just plain new) shows, movies, and documentaries into their ever-rotating libraries. So what’s a dedicated reader to watch? Well, whatever you want, of course, but the name of this website is Literary Hub, so we sort of have an angle. To […]
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Aug 03, 2021
What time is it?! If you’re a young millennial, you might’ve sung “Summertime! Anticipation!” out loud, and now the songs from High School Musical will be stuck in your head for the rest of the day, and I’m sorry. If you’re a book lover and avid reader of this site, though, you know that it’s […]
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Aug 03, 2021
On the morning of my flight to San Francisco last February, I sent Alex a video clip panning the snow-dusted sidewalk outside my apartment in Manhattan. Shuffling towards the subway, the wheels of my rolling suitcase leaving a trail of parallel lines in my path, I felt my phone vibrate in my pocket. “This is […]
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Aug 03, 2021
History class, Tehran, 1994: Our teacher, a devout woman with a white diamond-shaped face framed by a black hijab, asked us to transcribe in our notebooks the heroic story of Ruholla Khomeini’s rise to power from our history textbook. Woven into the story was an invective against America, referred to as “the great Satan,” the […]
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Aug 03, 2021
On the little black and white TV in my parent’s kitchen I listened to politicians promise to “Build Back Better” in the aftermath of Katrina. It was the same rah-rah-rah I heard from them after every disaster I’d paid attention to since 9/11. Post-disaster politicians profess their communities are resilient, despite the disaster. They frame […]
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Aug 03, 2021
To write my novel The Perfume Thief, I spent a few years researching the cultural and political currency of perfume and fashion during WWII, and the role that luxury plays in perceptions of conquest and defeat. I also pondered what perfumes a perfume thief might thieve, leading me deep into the thickets of the archives […]
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Aug 03, 2021
On April 14, 2018, a civil rights lawyer named David Buckel burned himself alive in Prospect Park. He did it alone, just before sunrise, a brief illumination on a peripheral lawn. A cyclist found his body in a circle of char, though she had to pass by several times to be sure of what she’d […]
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Aug 03, 2021
Big Table is a half-hour arts program/podcast, an exploration of art and culture as told through interviews with authors and artists, conducted and curated by writer, editor, and publisher JC Gabel and a small cast of contributors. In this episode, Geoff Dyer discusses Broadsword Calling Danny Boy: Watching Where Eagles Dare, published by Pantheon/Vintage, his […]
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Aug 02, 2021
“I get serious whenever I go in the hood to teach poetry because I know it’s me sitting in those seats.” Ali Black on unlearning craft and writing reliable poems. | Lit Hub Poetry Surviving this ongoing pandemic “is a project as philosophical as it is political,” writes Benjamin Bratton, so how can Philosophy stop […]
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Aug 02, 2021
As yet another wave of infection blooms and the bitter assignment of vaccine passes becomes a reality, societies are being held hostage by a sadly familiar coalition of the uninformed, the misinformed, the misguided, and the misanthropic. They are making vaccine passports, which no one wants, a likely necessity. Without their noise and narcissism, vaccination […]
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