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Jun 19, 2021
Benjamin Hedin considers The Lives of Girls and Women, the genre-curious book that “tells us how Alice Munro became Alice Munro.” | Lit Hub Criticism How Edgar Allan Poe’s 1844 balloon hoax launched a “powerful if chaotic machine of publicity, doubt, and belief.” | Lit Hub History Neal Allen (or Mr. Anne Lamott) reflects on […]
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Jun 18, 2021
To say there are “two Americas” immediately calls to mind any number of great sociocultural divides—Black/white, rich/poor, urban/rural—but one of the abiding tensions in this country has long been between civic conformity and individual eccentricity; or, if we are to locate these ideas as places in the American imagination: Suburbia and Bohemia. This particular divide—very […]
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Jun 18, 2021
Jonathan Lee’s The Great Mistake, Kai Bird’s The Outlier, Nathan Harris’ The Sweetness of Water, and Ruth Scurr’s Napoleon all feature among the Best Reviewed Books of the Week. Brought to you by Book Marks, Lit Hub’s “Rotten Tomatoes for books.”   Fiction 1. The Great Mistake by Jonathan Lee (Knopf) 4 Rave • 6 […]
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Jun 18, 2021
The other day, I sat down to watch What a Girl Wants. In case you were living under a rock in the early 2000s, the film follows a young Amanda Bynes, the daughter of a hippie wedding singer, who dreads watching the ceremonious Father Daughter Dance because she does not know her father. Her father, Colin […]
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Jun 18, 2021
Jennette Gordon-Reed and Elizabeth Hinton talk to Jelani Cobb about their new books, On Juneteenth and America on Fire, and the nation’s ongoing struggle to make sense of protest and rebellion, from emancipation to the murder of George Floyd. | Lit Hub Politics How the legacy of slavery warps the world for Black women: read an excerpt from […]
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Jun 18, 2021
Although characters seem to live in fictional worlds the way people exist in reality, a story’s cast is as artificial as a ballet troupe—a society choreographed to meet an author’s purpose. And what is that purpose? Why do writers do this? Why create human facsimiles? Why not spend our days with friends and family, content […]
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Jun 18, 2021
The following is from Rebecca Hall’s Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts, illustrated by Hugo Martínez.   ____________________________________________________ Excerpt adapted from Wake: The Hidden History of Women-Led Slave Revolts. Used with the permission of the publisher, Simon & Schuster. Copyright © 2021 by Rebecca Hall.
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Jun 18, 2021
For many Americans, the Trump presidency gave us a daily dose of depravity we willingly subjected ourselves to in the hopes that our informed outrage would somehow, in the long run, matter. The trivialization, the obscenity, the misogyny, the smug logic of white supremacy, the juvenile character national politics took on throughout this time, the […]
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Jun 18, 2021
When I write a novel, my goal is to get out of my own way and give myself to the characters, which can make it both a painful and revelatory process, but one that always leaves me feeling more expansive. Invariably I feel like I come out the other end an improved, more experienced person […]
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Jun 18, 2021
A story about an alien invasion typically revolves around diplomacy, military strategy, technological one-upmanship, and brinksmanship. But the invaders in Andy Weir’s Project Hail Mary are anything but typical. Rather than a scheming sentient enemy, Weir gives readers Astrophage, an opponent who is mindless—and microscopic. Astrophage lives on—and taps energy from—the surface of stars. When […]
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Jun 18, 2021
Fifteen miles southwest of Edinburgh, a knuckled red fist rises from a soft green landscape: five peaks of rose-gold gravel stand bound together by grass and moss, like a Martian mountain range or earthworks on the grandest of scales. They are spoil heaps. Each peak rises along a sharp ridge from the same point on […]
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Jun 18, 2021
Earlier this year, Annette Gordon-Reed and Elizabeth Hinton spoke with New Yorker staff writer Jelani Cobb to discuss their new books: Gordon-Reed’s On Juneteenth and Hinton’s America on Fire. The Essential Kerner Commission Report, edited and introduced by Cobb, is forthcoming next month. Tracing the legacy of racial injustice in the United States and our […]
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Jun 18, 2021
We’re not a religious family in the traditional sense. I’ve only seen my family genuflect when boxes of Entenmann’s pastries are on sale two-for-one at the Grand Union, and 60 percent of us were born so far out of wedlock our birth certificates list “who cares” in the space where you indicate the father’s name. […]
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Jun 18, 2021
Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world’s leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Robert Pearl, the author of Uncaring, to discuss the state of the American healthcare system—and how we […]
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Jun 17, 2021
“The term ‘Internet Literature’ seems perfectly designed to divide us, but we’re getting it all wrong.” Shya Scanlon on our love-hate relationship with that new, wobbly genre. | Lit Hub Criticism Laura Raicovich considers Nan Goldin’s protest against the Sacklers, the myth of neutrality in our cultural spaces, and what accountability means for museums. | […]
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Jun 17, 2021
The term “Internet Literature” seems perfectly designed to divide us, but we’re getting it all wrong. In a somewhat recent tweet, novelist Christian TeBordo only half-jokingly suggested that “a true internet novel would be one in which most sentences don’t have a subject, there are at least a dozen typos per page, and the punctuation […]
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Jun 17, 2021
It’s mid-March, freezing and gray outside, and my contemporary novel writing students have just turned in their midterm papers. It’s my second year teaching this course at Yale, my alma mater, and I’m enjoying the semester far more than I thought I would. Even though we’ve been relegated to a Zoom classroom, which I teach […]
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Jun 17, 2021
As you may recall, right around St. Patrick’s Day in 2020, pretty much every bookstore on earth suspended all in-person author events indefinitely. Since then, book people like us have been cut off from meeting our favorite authors and have had to settle for watching glitchy versions of them on Zoom from our couches while […]
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Jun 17, 2021
Sitting in the Bartos Theatre at New York’s Museum of Modern Art in November of 2018, I was waiting for curator Paola Antonelli to kick off one of her “R&D Salons,” which bring together artists, scientists, activists, experts, and various other creative minds to think through thorny questions of our times. Salon twenty-nine was titled […]
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Jun 17, 2021
When I was young my mother rarely talked about her youth, but the things she did share were awful. It was a childhood filled with trauma, so much and so heinous that she would probably score a three or higher on the Adverse Childhood Experiences Quiz. For those are aren’t familiar, the ACEs Quiz distills […]
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Jun 17, 2021
The earliest dinner I remember: pasta. My dorm kitchen, boxers and a tee shirt. I kept quiet. I chopped vegetables. Did the work. Anna was my first serious girlfriend, my first girlfriend at all. The way food and gender and family all swirled together for me, she didn’t know any of that yet. She only […]
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Jun 17, 2021
As an undergraduate creative writing student, one piece of feedback kept appearing on the margin of my stories: awkward phrasing. Red markings littered my pages, arrows pointing every which way, words circled or crossed out, re-written passages squeezed between lines. As a result, I began to obsess over language. I read contemporary fiction by American-born […]
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Jun 17, 2021
Trailblazing authors Kaitlyn Greenidge (Libertie), Brandon Hobson (The Removed), Elissa Washuta (White Magic), and Dani Putney (Salamat sa Intersectionality) join the Virtual Franklin Park Reading Series for a multi-genre event hosted by Marae Hart. The Virtual Franklin Park Reading Series is an online event series from the producers of the long-running, Crown Heights, Brooklyn-based Franklin […]
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Jun 17, 2021
We Have Ways of Making You Talk is a weekly show exploring the war in close up, hosted by comedian Al Murray and historian James Holland as they discuss all matters Second World War. How did the myth develop that British soldiers were always stopping for tea? And who were the first Allied troops back […]
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Jun 16, 2021
How Edgar Allan Poe’s 1844 balloon hoax, splashed across the front page of the New York Sun, launched a “powerful if chaotic machine of publicity, doubt, and belief.” | Lit Hub History “And as I love you I love your work and as you are me your work is mine. I could not have you […]
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