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Archive by category: WaterstonesReturn
Feb 23, 2021

Boasting a remarkable roster of literary talent from Sara Collins and Lisa Taddeo to Laura Bates and Yomi Adegoke, This Is How We Come Back Stronger is an anthology of writing born out of Feminist Book Society's author events and discussions. In this exclusive piece, the editors of the anthology explain how the pandemic hastened the necessity for such a volume and what they hope will be its lasting legacy.  

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Feb 22, 2021

In her phenomenal debut novel The Lamplighters, Emma Stonex tells the disquieting story of the disappearance of a group of lighthouse keepers off the coast of 1970s Cornwall. This exclusive piece discusses the roles played by the wives of these mysterious figures and how they came to dominate the story's narrative.   

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Feb 22, 2021

Saima Mir, author of exciting new crime thriller The Khan, has been gratified to note that there is now more publishing centred on strong female South Asian protagonists than there was a few years ago. In this piece, Saima picks those novels (and characters) that have spoken most deeply to her. 

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Feb 16, 2021

Who's Loving You is a vibrant new collection of romantic fiction from women of colour and boasts contributions from some of the most exciting contemporary literary voices. Featuring an introduction from the anthology's editor Sareeta Domingo, we are delighted to share an extract from Sara Collins's short story Brief Encounters.

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Feb 15, 2021

To celebrate the arrival of Klara and the Sun – the much-anticipated new novel from the Nobel Prize-winning author of The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go – we have a special treat for our readers. In this exclusive Q&A, Kazuo Ishiguro talks about Klara and her world and the inspiration behind this stunning story of artificial intelligence and human emotion. 

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Feb 12, 2021

Becoming a parent for the first time can feel like a very daunting task. From (not) sleeping to feeding to getting the right baby monitor and crib, it can feel like there are a million different choices and that everything depends on making the right one, all the time. Fortunately, there are plenty of books out there that are packed full of sound advice and reassuring testimony from other mothers - here is our pick of the best of them.   

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Feb 12, 2021

There are few words that pack more emotion and memories than 'mother'. From ever-green children's classics to contemporary masterpieces, novels have always been a rich territory for exploring the joys and challenges of being someone's mum. We have picked ten memorable mothers in fiction, each of whom must face their own unique challenges but who all share one thing: being a good mother.

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Feb 12, 2021

Both a heartwarming tale about the bond between a young girl and a polar bear and a beautifully judged warning about the consequences of climate change, Hannah Gold's The Last Bear is an engrossing, timely story for middle-grade readers. In this exclusive piece, Hannah discusses the impetus behind writing the book and recommends five other great reads about nature, animals and understanding the climate crisis.   

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Feb 11, 2021

The writer behind The Stormkeeper Trilogy, one of the most exciting children's adventure series of recent years, Catherine Doyle knows a thing or two about creating fully realised fictional worlds that her readers long to return to. As the trilogy concludes with The Storm Keeper's Battle, Catherine selects those well-loved stories that feel like coming home.

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Feb 05, 2021

Tom Percival's brilliant new picture book, The Invisible, tackles themes of child poverty and social exclusion in a sensitive manner that introduces a potentially difficult subject to young children. In this deeply personal, child-friendly piece, Tom discusses his drive to create the story as well as talking about his own childhood experience of living hand-to-mouth whilst growing up in the 1980s.

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Jan 28, 2021

Adam Rutherford's How to Argue With a Racist has taken its rightful place amongst other vital contemporary volumes interrogating systemic racism in modern society. In the period of time between its original publication and its paperback incarnation (and selection as Waterstones Non-Fiction Book of the Month for February) an awful lot has happened and it all impacts on notions of race and the appalling inequality suffered by minority groups. In this exclusive piece, Rutherford details these tumultuous events and what they mean for a progressive and enlightened society.

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Jan 27, 2021

Stepping nimbly between the hard truths and amusing absurdities of everyday life, Lily King’s Writers & Lovers our Fiction Book of the Month for February – follows a young writer through various emotional crossroads on her journey of turning life into literature. In this essay, the author discusses the background of the novel, processing grief, and sticking with your dreams. 

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Jan 26, 2021

Rebecca Wait's Our Fathers, our Thriller of the Month for February, focuses on the legacy of a horrific family murder on the sole survivor and the inhabitants of the island community where it took place. In this exclusive piece, Rebecca reflects upon both her own experience of toxic masculinity and her researches into violent crimes perpetrated by men on their loved ones. 

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Jan 26, 2021

From the history of the world's first synthetic dye in Mauve to sharing the stories behind different fonts in Just My Type, Simon Garfield has explored an incredible variety of topics in his betselling non-fiction. In his new book, Dog’s Best Friend, Garfield turns his attention to the age-old and very special relationship between humans and dogs. In this exclusive piece, he shares his favourite novels that feature unforgettable canine characters.

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Jan 25, 2021

With authoritarian regimes proliferating across the globe, these days it can often feel like we are living in our very own dystopian novel. We've gathered together our favourite, most prescient, literary dystopias from classics like Brave New World and We to contemporary examples such as The Farm and Vox. Whether exploring the ways parts of society are oppressed, the impact of new technologies on humanity or the near future's obsession with sadistic entertainment, these books are all stark warnings against the power of an all-controlling state and the double-edged nature of progress.     

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Jan 20, 2021

Waterstones Children's Book of the Month for February, Benjamin Dean's Me, My Dad and the End of the Rainbow is a joyous depiction of love, difference and the power of family. In this exclusive piece, Benjamin discusses five children's books that warm his heart and put a smile on his face.   

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Jan 20, 2021

In his latest book All the Lonely People, the bestselling author Mike Gayle offers gentle and humorous observations on ageing, race and the bonds of friendship and family through the moving story of a Bromley-dwelling widower. In this exclusive piece, Gayle talks about his novel and recommends five great reads that explore being on your own from different perspectives.

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Jan 18, 2021

A powerful exploration of mourning, love and ritual, Mrs Death Misses Death is the debut novel of the acclaimed poet and writer Salena Godden. An exhilarating journey through different times and climes, this though-provoking story follows Death itself as the titular protagonist and a young writer who embarks on chronicling her memoir. In this exclusive piece, Godden talks about how the novel came into being, the geography of grief, and the importance of those connections that might not always be obvious.  

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Jan 18, 2021

The winner of the Costa 2020 First Novel Award, Ingrid Persaud's evocative, Trinidad-set debut Love After Love centres around an unconventional family unit and narrated in turn by its three members – Betty, her young son Solo and their Lodger, Mr Chetan. We are delighted to share an excerpt from the novel, with a brief foreword from the author. 

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Jan 15, 2021

Full of warmth, wit and compassion, Huma Qureshi's memoir How We Met details a childhood spent trying to reconcile school life in Walsall with the expectations of her strict Pakistani parents, and how the events of later years - and her falling in love with a non-Muslim - were shaped by both these experiences. In this exclusive piece, Huma recounts how she saw her own romantic predicament reflected in the classic novels of Jane Austen, Georgette Heyer and Henry James.        

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Jan 14, 2021
Aristotle called it 'one soul in two bodies', Coleridge 'the sheltering tree'. Jane Austen declared it 'the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love', whilst Maya Angelou compared it to trying to be a rainbow in someone's cloud. Whatever definition we give to friendship, it's always worth celebrating. From best-loved classics to exciting fresh reads, we've gathered together some brilliant novels that explore the varied ways friendship can enrich and shape one's life – and one's person. Indeed, as Don Quixote's loyal sidekick Sancho Panza proverbially puts it, 'Tell me your company, and I’ll tell you who you are'.
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Jan 13, 2021

With the return of Tom Gates and Miss Peregrine's peculiar children, February boasts some eagerly anticipated children's books, alongside exciting debuts from the likes of Hannah Gold, Zillah Bethell and Namina Forna. 

Please Note: Due to the ongoing situation concerning the Covid-19 pandemic, publication dates are liable to change at short notice. 

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Jan 13, 2021

If ever there was a perfect time to escape into a world of uplifting stories it is now. In this blog you will find our favourite feel-good tales from the last few years, each one guaranteed to put a smile on your face, a spring in your step and a lovely warm feeling in your heart. 

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Jan 12, 2021

Sarah J Maas, Mick Herron and Francis Spufford all make very welcome returns to the publishing fray this month, whilst Nikesh Shukla discusses fatherhood and feminism, Bill Gates sets out his manifesto for tackling climate change and Simon Garfield espouses the unbreakable bond between human and canine. Discover a world of great reading this February.

Please Note: Due to the ongoing situation concerning the Covid-19 pandemic, publication dates are liable to change at short notice.      

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Jan 12, 2021

In her powerful memoir All the Young Men, Ruth Coker Burks shares her experiences of caring for men with HIV and AIDS in the highly conservative1980s Arkansas. From helping them to find accommodation and work to taking care of their funeral arrangements, she forged deep friendships with those she looked after – often young gay men, shunned and vilified by their community, including their own families. In this exclusive piece, Coker Burks discusses the importance of bringing joy and hope in the middle of a desperate situation and why she decided now was the time to finally share her story.

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