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Archive by author: Return
May 17, 2021
A new homeowner muses about the books that shaped her garden, including a book of Indigenous wisdom and sci-fi about bees.
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May 17, 2021
Why this comics reader sails the Pipster ship featuring The Trickster and the Pied Piper, paired in COUNTDOWN TO FINAL CRISIS.
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May 17, 2021
The list of Pulitzer Prize-winning books is dominated by white men, so we're highlighting winning nonfiction by women and people of color.
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May 17, 2021

Venture out into the great, wide universe of Star Wars and its books, including A New Dawn, with a Star Wars noob.

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May 17, 2021
Book nooks are book-sized inserts that are essentially mini-dioramas. These are some of my favorite DIY book nook shelf inserts!

- Tika Viteri

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May 17, 2021

Get cozy with these 2020 mysteries you may have missed, including Mimi Lee Gets a Clue by Jennifer J Chow.

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May 17, 2021
From quite common to more obscure, get to know more about verse with this A to Z guide to poetry and poetic terminology.
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May 17, 2021
Explore a different era in these historical fiction books set in the 1960s, with stories about race, class, political turmoil, and more.
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May 17, 2021
Celebrate Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month by reading the AAPI authors that Book Riot readers think everyone should know!
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May 17, 2021
This librarian has some magic tricks that'll help you find the right books for any young library patron, including reluctant readers.
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May 17, 2021

This first world war poem remains loyal to the patriotic ethos of its time, but the human cost of combat is never denied

The Unconquered Dead

“… defeated, with great loss.”

Not we the conquered! Not to us the blame
Of them that flee, of them that basely yield;
Nor ours the shout of victory, the fame
Of them that vanquish in a stricken field.

That day of battle in the dusty heat
We lay and heard the bullets swish and sing
Like scythes amid the over-ripened wheat,
And we the harvest of their garnering.

Some yielded, No, not we! Not we, we swear
By these our wounds; this trench upon the hill
Where all the shell-strewn earth is seamed and bare,
Was ours to keep; and lo! we have it still.

We might have yielded, even we, but death
Came for our helper; like a sudden flood
The crashing darkness fell; our painful breath
We drew with gasps amid the choking blood.

The roar fell faint and farther off, and soon
Sank to a foolish humming in our ears,
Like crickets in the long, hot afternoon
Among the wheat fields of the olden years.

Before our eyes a boundless wall of red
Shot through by sudden streaks of jagged pain!
Then a slow-gathering darkness overhead
And rest came on us like a quiet rain.

Not we the conquered! Not to us the shame,
Who hold our earthen ramparts, nor shall cease
To hold them ever; victors we, who came
In that fierce moment to our honoured peace.

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May 17, 2021
In an era of endless Zillow scrolling, Nora Caplan-Bricker considers the novels of Tana French, “in which the lust for property is always primary to the plot, and always somehow morally deforming.” | Lit Hub Criticism “A cliché is just a metaphor that’s been destroyed by its own success.” Edward St. Aubyn in conversation with […]
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May 17, 2021
Sebastian Junger’s new book covers a long trek across the countryside in search of true independence.
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May 17, 2021
In the Irish mystery novel Broken Harbor, by the American expat writer Tana French, a detective arrives at the scene of a triple murder and steps into what feels like a real-estate ad. Other than a bloody tableau in the kitchen, where the wife was found clinging to life and the husband lies dead, and […]
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May 17, 2021
Earlier this year, Edward St. Aubyn spoke with Merlin Sheldrake about their most recent books: St. Aubyn’s Double Blind, which wrestles deeply with ideas and questions from the sciences, and Sheldrake’s Entangled Life, about fungi. Their conversation is below, and you can listen to them together on Vintage Books’ podcast here. * Merlin Sheldrake: I’m […]
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May 17, 2021
At a recent job interview, where I read a story of mine that included angels perched on the rooftops of a suburban neighborhood after a school shooting, someone asked, “But why the angels? Why not just write about a school shooting?” He meant it as a general critique of magical realism and genre. I had, […]
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May 17, 2021
Big Table is a half-hour arts program/podcast, an exploration into art and culture as told through interviews with authors and artists, conducted and curated by writer, editor, and publisher J.C. Gabel and a small cast of contributors. Along for the Ride director Nick Ebeling unpacks the enigma of Dennis Hopper and his blacklisted years as […]
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May 17, 2021
I come from a nonconfrontational family. Immigrant grandparents who worked hard, kept their heads down, didn’t talk about their feelings. Who stayed polite because they didn’t feel entitled to anything, because they were always just a little afraid of being reminded that they didn’t belong. Who wanted a better life for their children, and who […]
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May 17, 2021
Grief, according to the Stoics, is another form of distress. Since it focuses on losses largely outside our full control, it is an emotion that needs to be managed. It signals that we are hostage to fortune. Loved persons and things, homes and homelands, cultural heritages and religious sites, all are indifferents to be preferred […]
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May 17, 2021
Mark Stucky was about to lose another race. This one was personal. In 2009 Stucky and an Air Force lieutenant colonel named Jack Fischer made a wager over who would get to space first. Stucky had just joined Scaled (which would be bought out by Virgin Galactic in 2012), and Fischer had just joined NASA. […]
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May 17, 2021
For tens of thousands of years, human beings have been using fictional devices to shape their worlds and communicate with one another. Four thousand years ago they began writing down these stories, and a great flourishing of human achievement began. We know it today as literature, a term broad enough to encompass everything from ancient […]
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May 17, 2021
Emergence Magazine is a quarterly online publication exploring the threads connecting ecology, culture, and spirituality. As we experience the desecration of our lands and waters, the extinguishing of species, and a loss of sacred connection to the Earth, we look to emerging stories. Each issue explores a theme through innovative digital media, as well as […]
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May 17, 2021
As the founding editor of the Canadian Oxford Dictionary, she turned to “trashy novels” and parliamentary debates to find Canada’s version of the language.
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May 17, 2021

This dizzying history tour of disasters takes its lead from Covid, and China’s role in ‘cold war II’, but offers little clarity or relief from Ferguson’s flawed certainties

Is there such a thing as a timely history book? If the point of history is to gain objective distance from past events, then timeliness can only be a pleasing accident rather than an outcome that is consciously sought. Yet with a column-writing historian such as Niall Ferguson, someone who is engaged prolifically in current affairs, the call of the now appears nigh on impossible to ignore.

And so his latest book, Doom, takes its lead from the Covid pandemic and seeks to place it in a historical context of other natural and manmade disasters – the two, as he rightly points out, are usually conjoined. The subtitle is The Politics of Catastrophe, and Ferguson’s basic thesis is that all disasters are grounded in “a history of economics, society, culture, and politics”.

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May 16, 2021

The author of the hit YA fantasy talks about Netflix stardom, making her novels more diverse and why she had to give up a close relationship with her fans

When Leigh Bardugo first came face to face with her characters, she wept. In a video that was uploaded everywhere from YouTube to TikTok, the author stepped on to the Budapest set of Netflix’s Shadow and Bone and embraced her heroine, Alina – or rather, the actor Jessie Mei Li in costume. “You guys look amazing,” Bardugo repeats in the video, between hugs and tears. “You look so incredible. It’s actually eerie.”

“Adaptation is scary,” Bardugo says now. “I don’t begrudge any author the right to say that they don’t want to do it, because we’ve all seen it go wrong. It would be heartbreaking to be locked out of the house that you built. But I got lucky, because the people I collaborated with cared deeply – not just about the material, but the people who love it.”

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